Posts Tagged ‘Los Angeles Dodgers’

A Toast to the Team With The Mostest (Wins In the NL West…)

September 19, 2013

Nine and a half back on June twenty two
Dodger fans singin the last-place blues

#FireMattingly trends every day
Time to trade Kemp, it’s already May

Too many people actin like quitters
Instead of embracing what I was preaching on twitter

Collarbones, hammys and shoulders galore
Forced us to play guys with negative WAR

I said “Wait for the lineup to finally click!”
These “fans” kept hating, making me sick

So I got off the web and tried to ignore,
But had to peek every batter or four

I changed my bio to a simple claim,
After the team’s 50th bad game
See y’all at the West title party
The jeers were loud, and the laughs were hearty

Then a godsend from Cuba got the call,
And Hanley recovered and stopped our fall

Dre started swingin, Jazz Hands too
And luck started turnin for Dodger Blue

Everyone surprised at the run they made
Except for the few who knew they could play

Kershaw making a historic run,
Greinke and Ryu and Ricky stun

Paco and Kenley lock it down,
While Crawford and Ellis continue to pound
9 and a half back on June 22
From worst to first goes Dodger Blue

Now it’s official, it’s finally here
The division is ours, playoffs are near
So to every single fan who stuck it out

Stand for Vin and give it a a shout:

“We at the West party there was never a doubt!”

To the fair weather fans who nearly gave up

Grab a drink and lift your cup

Take this as a lesson to NEVER give up

Sarcastically asking every day
If I “got World Series tickets? They can’t even play!”
Yes, I do, as a matter of fact
You should too, despite the faith you lacked

So even if you were negative all spring
Let’s cheers our beers and drink and sing

Raise your glass for a toast, I say

As we celebrate an awesome, glorious, happy #ClinchDay

To the team we all love
That came back from the dead
Made the #DodgerFam proud
And their opponents dread

Here’s to the Dodgers, our NL West champs,
Their march to October and a World Series chance.

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The 2013 MLB Fan Cave Results Are In…

March 13, 2013

IMG_0898Before I tell you about the call I received from the MLB Fan Cave today, let me once again thank everyone as much as the interwebs will allow for the unrelenting support from you all over the past couple months. The voting, sharing, reading, tip-giving and every other -ing verb you all took part in has been incredible to say the least.

Whether you are a loving member of my immediate family or fellow baseball fan tweeting from Oklahoma, I really wish I could thank every single one of you in person.

Alas, that is not possible. So please accept this blog as my metaphorical high-five/thank you hug combination. Anyway, down to business:

I regret to inform you (eh, too cliché) On a dark and stormy night (NO.) Bad news bears, people. The MLB Fan Cave discovered that I was ingesting performance-enhancing substances (mostly cookies and beer), over the course of this campaign and promptly disqualified me.

That’s my story and I’m sticking to it.

But the truth is, the powers that be at the Fan Cave have officially chosen their nine representatives for this season (whose names I will NOT reveal no matter how much you bribe me, as I do not want my new friends getting in trouble before they even touch down in New York), and my name is not among them.

I’ll answer your first question right quick — yes, of course I’m disappointed. I was, still am, and always will be very confident in my abilities to rock a contest like this. Just like the other final 29, I thought I was going to get the “good” call this week. I’ve spent countless hours, days, weeks and months on my parents’ couch watching, analyzing, writing about, and loving baseball for as long as I can remember. And I think I do it better than most.

That being said, the talent in this competition was unbelievable. It’s a tough gig to get, especially when you’re squaring off with so many others who possess equal, if not better, blogging, creative, and social media expertise. So I’m proud of the nine who will be advancing (stay tuned to MLBFanCave.com for the announcement about a week from today), and the 20 other finalists who received bad news.

Just like last year, I’ve made some unbreakable friendships through this process and experienced amazing moments with these men and women. We will all stay in touch and continue to bond via Facebook, Twitter, and fantasy sports through our love for baseball.

Now, enough of the sappy stuff. Let’s talk about me.

But, seriously. Let’s talk about me. No matter where I’m watching my Dodgers play this season, the passion won’t subside. You will still be spammed by endless Bleacher Report links (how many of you just blocked me on Facebook?) and be expected to defend me if I come to blows in the bleachers at AT&T Park this summer.

IMG_0922

I have no idea yet if I’ll be re-applying for the Fan Cave in 2014. That’s like asking me if I’ll get back together with __________ (insert name of ex-girlfriend here) two hours after we broke up! It’s too fresh.

Plus, next year marks my 25th birthday, meaning I will have spent the majority of a quarter-century with a baseball for a brain. That’s scary. If it doesn’t work out again, is it time to hang up the jock strap, spit out the Big League Chew, and go travel the world or write a book or skinny dip in piranha-infested waters (I didn’t have a real third one…forgive my modest life goals)? Maybe.

But I’ll tell you this much — I still have more to give to this contest. I know I have a spot in the baseball workin’ world. I have no doubt that I am a living, breathing specimen for the purpose of watching baseball all summer, writing “top-10 nut shot” lists, and filming song parodies about Mike Trout.

And I know I can do better. That’s not necessarily an admission of regret; just an acknowledgement of room for improvement in certain aspects of my performance in Arizona.

If I do re-apply, you’ll know. But let’s just all take a break for one glorious baseball season, huh?

Now back to you lovely people. I honestly could not have gotten this far without your support, and thank you again for everything. My family and friends who cheered, voted and shared all my links. My #DodgerFam on Twitter and r/Dodgers thread on Reddit. Anyone who hosted me on their podcast or wrote about me on a blog. My uber-fan brethren on Three Up, Three Down. All the A-list actors, directors and choreographers who helped film all that ridiculous, goofy content I put together along the way. And again, the rest of the country’s most dedicated fans.IMG_0932

Even though I didn’t make it, I can’t be too upset. Not only are they making a Veronica Mars mov–uh, sorry. What I meant to write is, how else would I have ever met the kindest, cuddliest baseball fan of all time, @SuperFanPete, for example? Or the pro’s pro, @SamDingman? I mean…for god’s sake, I never would have known the happiest, giggliest Yankees fan ever, @Stephelovee, existed!

I love you all. Thanks for helping me along the way and for following along with the journey. I’ll never forget it. Please continue to follow my blogs and all my sports writing. It is what I love to do, and each read or comment or “like” is akin to finding an Easter egg full of candy and puppies. I seriously mean that.

So no matter if I’ve met you in person before, keep chatting me up about the greatest sport in the world (Or anything else. I do also accept the following conversation topics: Russian gymnasts, Vin Diesel quotes, and this commercial.). Heck, let’s go to a game together and revel in the glory ourselves! If I’m lucky, you’ll even buy me a beer!

What? I’m an unpaid intern. Cut me some slack.

Peace, Dodgers, and bunting forever,

Jeremy

The MLB Fan Cave Top 30 Experience: Day One

February 20, 2013

IMG_0898Where do I even begin? Needless to say, these past 48 hours in Arizona have been amazing, stressful, hilarious and downright unforgettable. After coming so close to being here last year, this is a special treat for me. I wasn’t sure I’d have the chance to show off my skills in person this season, but here I am, and I’m making the most of my time!

Below, I’ll give you the run down (see what I did there?) of what we’ve been doing on the casting trip thus far. But if you haven’t yet checked out yesterday’s Tumblr photo blog, check it out HERE!

And please follow along with the journey on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Tout for the most up-to-date info. Better yet, like the MLB Fan Cave Facebook page, Twitter and Instagram for the MOST up-to-date info.

I was exhausted when we arrived at the hotel on Monday night, but we all went out to eat at the made-famous-last-year Jerry’s Diner next door. After meeting most of the Top 30, I finished up some work in the hotel room and crashed, because Tuesday was the first big day of the competition.

First thing Tuesday morning, we hopped on the infamous MLB Fan Cave bus and rode (in style) over to Chase Field, home of the Arizona Diamondbacks. They were still rolling out the sod for the upcoming World Baseball Classic games that were going to be held there, but we essentially had the whole place to ourselves! After a quick pep talk from some of the executives who run the Fan Cave, we were off to start the audition process.

I’ve gotten to know a lot of the people who actually make the Cave tick behind the scenes, and everyone has been amazingly supportive and helpful so far. The fact that I’m a Dodgers fan living in San Francisco and the “Fan Cave Couple” story line definitely struck a chord with some of them, and I ended up having a lot of really good talks early in the day.

After that, I was chosen to go down to the D’Backs dugout and do a camera test with MLB Network’s own Greg Amsinger through the Ballpark Cam. They hooked me up to all sorts of wires and ear plugs, handed me a mic, and let Greg fire a round of questions my way. I think it went very well, especially because I was first in line and had to set the precedent for the rest of the group. Greg and I ended up laughing a lot about how Kelsey and I manage to watch games together, my wardrobe choices, and many other baseball-related activities.

We finished that up and went straight to the part of the week I was dreading the most: the elevator pitch. Essentially, they gave us one minute to sell ourselves to the MLB Fan Cave staff and prove that we are someone they want in the Fan Cave. I’d rehearsed my pitch a million times and nailed everything, emerging out of it with a very good, but not perfect feeling about it. When told I “was blessed with Brian Wilson’s beard on my chest” at the end of it, I got a hearty chuckle from the room.

Later in the day, a large group of the Top 30 took part in a lip-synced version of a parody created by the Fan Cave. I won’t reveal which song, because I don’t want to ruin the epic-ness (that just became a word) of it all before it’s released. I can tell you that I found myself with a five-second starring role in the middle, simply by virtue of having my Clayton Kershaw jersey on at the right time.

To finish the first day, we ended up enjoying an amazing spread of food in the Diamond Club above right-center field and took part in a round of trivia. It was another chance to get to know some of the other finalists and executives I hadn’t chatted with yet.

My team (cleverly named “Dr. Fart,” might I add) was in second place with 25 points (two teams had 27) entering the final round, where we wagered 24 of those points. Unfortunately we barely missed on which four teams don’t have mascots (the Yankees, Dodgers, Cubs and Angels are mascot-less) and ended up losing the challenge.

Nobody could be down for losing trivia, because we jumped immediately into a couple of hours of karaoke, which started off with a bang when Bryan Mapes, Travis Miller, Ally Williams, Kelsey and myself nailed a rendition of “It’s Gonna Be Me” by N’Sync. Kelsey and I also had to cheese it up a little bit and do a “Summer Nights” duet. It was a ton of fun, even if I failed miserably at singing (but really, what’s new?).

After some last-minute karaoke team bonding and a long chat in the hot tub before bed, day one came to a close and I knocked out a few bits of work before hopping in bed to rest up for today. I still have half a day here before the competition officially ends, and I am looking forward to slaying a panel interview in about an hour, before taking on my fellow contestants in some fancy bowling at Lucky Strike to end the night.

Look for another blog in the next couple days detailing the second half of my Fan Cave journey, and keep it tuned to me on social media for the most current updates. Thanks for reading, and hopefully I’ll come home with some good news this weekend!

Valentine’s Day for Baseball Lovers – Pro Tips from the First MLB Fan Cave Couple

February 16, 2013

Cardinals are red,

Dodgers are blue,

When you both love baseball on VDay,

What do you do?  ❤

It’s Valentine’s Day, you and your significant other are huge baseball fans, and you have no idea how to celebrate. Sure, it might be the offseason…Going to a game is your go-to gift strategy, but never fear! The First Fan Cave Couple has some ideas for you!

Here are some V-Day gifts for baseball lovers from Kelsey and I:

1. Kelsey – Classic Valentines: MLB Style

You know those valentines you had to buy every one of your classmates as a kid? Why not send a whole box to your significant other? Better yet…why not buy the MLB pack (it exists!), and write a fun note on every single one. Or sign them from your favorite All-Stars. To go the extra mile, decorate the box in which you put them and voilà!

Cost: $

2. Jeremy – Fancy Feast: Not the Cat Food

No, not the cat food…unless you actually hate your partner. If he or she really loves baseball, then all they want for dinner on V-Day is a pile of cheap hot dogs, nachos and beer. Create a whole smorgasbord of ballpark favorites. Fast, easy and delicious! Show off those cooking skills!

Cost: $$

3. Kelsey – Two Words: “Spring Training”

Baseball may not be in your hometown, but if you’re lucky enough to have the moolah, you can head on down to Arizona or Florida to your favorite team’s camp. Spring Training is definitely an experience every baseball fan should have. The proximity to the players and to the game is unparalleled, and it definitely tides you over till Opening Day. Now, if you and your partner’s teams happen to be in separate states like our Cardinals and Dodgers…then things might get complicated. Flip a coin?

Cost: $$$

4. Jeremy – Chocolates: A là Bambino

Girls. Love. Chocolate. Well, so do guys. But ignore the cliché stares from the other men checking out at the grocery store and come home with some delicious chocolate for your girl. If you’re as lucky as me, your girlfriend will also root for a team that wears red, so the box color adds a nice touch. And there are plenty of baseball-themed options. Try those little baseball chocolates that come in goodie bags at birthday parties, or some appropriately named “Baby Ruths.” Grab a bouquet of flowers and you’re set!

Cost: $

5. Kelsey – Always a Favorite: Baseball Movie Marathon

You may not have the means to travel to baseball, but you can bring baseball to yourself on the big screen! You could even set up a projector outside to feel more like a part of the film. There are so many classic baseball movies…A League of Their Own and The Sandlot are two of my favorites. But I might suggest Moneyball. After all, “How can you not be romantic about baseball?”

Cost: $

6. Jeremy – The Ultimate: A Baseball “Fan Love” Package

It’s not as dirty as it sounds. I totally made this up, and I wish I had actually thought of it before today so Kelsey could get one, herself. A glove, a baseball-loving teddy bear, and a new hat of her favorite team on top says it all. I don’t care if your girlfriend can throw the ball a mile or couldn’t catch a beach ball if it was handed to her – this gift would still rock. Boom. Done. Home run.

Cost: $$

Valentines

For more fun couples tips, blog posts, and videos, make sure Kelsey and I get into the MLB Fan Cave! We have tons of ideas and we can’t wait to share them with you on a national stage.

Watch our video explaining how we got together.

Follow us on Twitter @kelseyshea11 and @jamblinman.

And like our Facebook pages: KelseyJeremy.

Reasons Sports Fans Love Christmas

December 25, 2012

Dodger jersey

Every good sports fan loves getting an autograph at a game, or a rookie card of their favorite player, or an authentic jersey. There’s just something about owning a small piece of merchandise that represents your team t

Why am I telling you this? Is it really worthy of a blog post? No, probably not. But I’m borderline giddy at some of the gifts I received this Christmas, so go ahead and indulge me, huh? In no particular order:hat brings a childish sense of glee to a sports fan.

Clayton Kershaw Jersey

Brownie points for the girlfriend! With my James Loney jersey rendered useless when the current Tampa Bay Ray was sent to Boston last season, I was down to zero relevant Dodger jerseys. Absolutely unacceptable. And with the influx of money through the new ownership, Kershaw should be a Dodger for life. Win!

Autographed Kershaw Photo

What are better than brownie points? Chocolate cake points? Because along with that jersey came an authentic, autographed picture of Kershaw delivering a pitch (undoubtedly a strike…) from his left arm. Sports fans LOVE getting autographs – even if it’s one in 100, it feels like one in a million.

Book of Dodger History and Photos

When you truly love a sports team, knowing everything about them becomes priority. I consider myself an expert on the Dodgers already, but this will only make me more knowledgeable. And the old-school, black and white pictures will give me even more respect for my team’s history.

Dodgers and 49ers Ornaments

A nice blue Dodger cap and a 49er football that lights up a snowman’s face when turned on? Yes, please! Ornaments are a Christmas tradition, and no matter how juvenile or otherwise-useless they may be.

Ballpark Calendar

With the exception of May 2013, every month in the ballpark calendar my sister got me absolutely rules (AT&T Park represents that horrid month). It even has old-school Ebbets Field, home of the Brooklyn Dodgers. I don’t usually use calendars, but this one will be run ragged.

Kirk Gibson Bobblehead and Bobblearm

Okay, so I got this one myself. I couldn’t help it! I’ve been wanting the greatest bobblehead in bobblehead-related history since it came out in the middle of this summer. Now, I finally own the 1988 World Series Game 1 bobblehead of Kirk Gibson, rounding the bases with his bobblearm fist-pumping away. Totally, awesomely worth it.

A Passive-Aggressive Letter to Major League Baseball

December 19, 2012

baseball moneyJust for the record, I hate when people write “Dear ________ (i.e. “Homework”), Please stop being so hard! Love, _______” on Facebook. So stop doing that. My version on this blog is awesome and clever, okay? Stop laughing!

Dear Major League Baseball,

First of all, thanks for all the great times. The home runs, the no-hitters, the magical moments, the near-misses, the joy and the agony, the PED’s and — wait. Okay, that’s enough dilly-dallying. I’ve sugar-coated this enough: I’m pissed.

It crosses my mind every so often. Usually when Joe Schmo So-and-So and his .225 average signs a six-year contract for $90 million that ends up equating to about $225,000 per hit each season. I accept it as fact and move on. Then Frank Tank Wanky Wank and his 1.35 WHIP signs for four years and $48 million, roughly $1 million per win each season.

And worst of all, players who actually deserve big money at the given market value, sign contracts worth between $200 million and $250 million dollars. For playing a sport. A child’s game, played by men.

Don’t get me wrong. I love you. I love baseball. Always have, always will. And I’d give at least half a nut to be playing in your league, making that kind of money for a daily routine of catch, batting practice and bullpen sessions.

But when I see articles like this, I get upset.

Josh Hamilton signing

Oh, did I mention I’m a Dodgers fan? I worship the team that spends hundreds of millions of dollars on free agents and negotiating rights and probably unnecessarily fast cars.

That team, and this sport is my passion. I realize this is “how it is.” And I definitely realize that I shouldn’t complain, since my team is riding that gravy train to being the best team in baseball on paper. But after the hypothetical confetti settles on a hypothetical World Series title, I’m going to get pissed again.

I apologize for the bluntness (no I don’t), but why are grown men with nary a financial management skill being handed game checks worth six figures for swinging a piece of wood at a ball of laced hide?

Professional athletes don’t have it as easy as I’m making it out to be, so I digress. It’s a tough job. And they deserve to be well-compensated for doing that job, especially when the ridiculous income would go straight to the slick-haired, three-piece-suited, likely dirty executives that run the league and the media otherwise.

But even a phenom like Mike Trout – and this isn’t a reach, since the market trends up every single year and he’s already the best player in the game at age 21 – is going to be in line for a contract worth over $300 million when he hits free agency.

Do you realize how much money that is? I’ve never had $300,000,000 $3,000,000 $30,000 $3,000 at any given time in my 24 years on this planet.

I get it. I understand the system. I really do. But what in the world does Albert Pujols do with his $27.5 million per year? Make a side cash salad with his dinners? What does Barry Zito do with his nearly $2 million per win? Buy every fedora and scarf in the Northern California region (that explains why I can’t find any good ones…)?

There are people all over the world starving for 1/100,000,000th of that total in a lifetime, let alone in one calendar year. Most third-world countries would beg for school supplies, shoes, and fresh water for their children.

And even in America, thousands upon thousands of hard-working people work two jobs just to afford rent on a crappy apartment in a shitty neighborhood. If they want to watch Mike Trout play baseball, they better find a hotel lobby with the game on. rich a-rod

I don’t mean to get all sappy and dramatic on you, but I’m just making a point. Here it is, in all its glory:

SALARY. CAP.

Yeah, yeah. It would be tough to sell the players on such a thing. The logistics would be hell. But any player who says, “I deserve $_______ million!” is only justified in saying so because there isn’t a cap. They see mediocre players getting gigantic bonuses, and expect to exceed that. They are right. But you are wrong.

Fix it. Now. Please. Even this die-hard Dodgers fan wants there to be a limit to how much his team can spend.

Here is my proposition: Contract length cap – 7 years. Contract amount cap – $12 million per year/$84 million in a contract. You don’t have to do away with contract options, bonuses and incentives, as long as they don’t exceed a total of $100 million and/or 10 years.

Stop crying, Richie Rich executive guy. You’ll still get a hefty paycheck yourself. You can allocate the leftover funds to making the stadiums nicer, safer and more fan-friendly. You can set up more promotions for your adoring fan bases. Allocate more money to minor league players, as a reward for making it that far. Maybe even donate to charities! Set up developmental leagues in inner cities and foreign countries. Spread the gospel that is the greatest sport in the world.

I’m sure the Albert Pujols and Mike Trouts of this world will survive without a fourteenth guest bedroom in their Malibu mansions.

Much love,

Jeremy Dorn

Baseball Conossieur/Broke-Ass Blogger

The Art of Fair Weather Fandom

December 12, 2012

imageI know what you’re thinking: Jeremy, how would you know? You are the most hardcore, dedicated, handsome Dodgers and 49ers fan this side of Matt Kemp!

First of all, thank you. I agree. And yes – believe it or not, Dodgers star center fielder is a diehard 49ers fan.

But that doesn’t mean I don’t know a thing or two about fair weather fandom. Take, for example, the fact that I “root” for the Seattle Sounders because my ex-girlfriend’s dad got me hammered drunk at the only game I’ve attended.

As far as I know, that’s the coolest soccer team in the country because of one very hazy experience I had.

Or let’s talk about the Indiana Pacers; Reggie Miller was my favorite NBA player growing up, so naturally, I rooted for the Pacers. It was weird, unique, different. And like a good little Jew, I loved three-pointers (It’s the SAME thing, for one more point! Why doesn’t everyone just shoot threes?).

We all know Reggie was the three-point master. And don’t mistake “fair weather” for “frontrunner.” Those are vastly different labels. I liked the Pacers, good or bad, because I thought they were cool.

I like the Sounders because the beer at their stadium does very interesting things to my body when taken in large quantities. Honestly, I have no idea if they are any good and I don’t care.

Being a “frontrunner” means you live near the Bay Area and didn’t know what a baseball looked like until 2010 when the local San Francisco Giants won their first World Series title. If you now root for them, wear their gear, and try to tell me why they are the best team around – you are a frontrunner. Once they regress, so does your fandom. And that year’s World Series champion will grace your clothing.

On the contrary, being a fair weather fan means you root for a team for whatever reason, but only pay attention when you feel like it. That’s how it goes for me with basketball. It’s a sport I mostly understand, but never really played and definitely can’t objectively analyze.

I’ve been a fair weather Warriors fan for years (very obvious example of not rooting for a first-place team), but luckily I don’t have to put my heart and soul into rooting for them. So all those tortured fans out there probably both hate and envy me.

Tonight, the Warriors beat the defending-champion Miami Heat and reigning-MVP LeBron James. I turned it on for the sheer idea of a distraction and because my alma mater’s pride and joy, Klay Thompson, now graces the Warriors’ front court.

Twenty seven points for Klay later, the Warriors were jumping up and down on the Miami home floor, celebrating a two-point victory and the continuation of a gritty, undefeated (so far) road trip.

I found myself leaping out of my seat when the final buzzer sounded – emotions usually reserved for a Vernon Davis touchdown or Clayton Kershaw anything.

And that is the art of fair weather fandom. If you can watch a team play a game and feel no personal connection to them, but still become emotionally moved by their performance, you can root for them.

Just admit that you are fair weather, and nobody will get hurt. Tonight, I admit to being a fair weather Warriors fan. For the rest of this season, I am officially declared as a supporter of the Dubs (see, I even have the lingo down!).

I mean, why not? Technically my favorite basketball team is 1-0 this year when I watch them play and as their biggest fan, I couldn’t be happier.

If you are a fair weather blogger, follow Jeremy on Twitter @Jamblinman!

The Lost Art of Sportsmanship

June 17, 2012

I hate to name names (no I don’t , who are we kidding here?), but @MattKempFanPage on Twitter is a class A douche. And it sucks, because he’s a Dodgers fan. Which isn’t always a compliment.

Look, I love my Dodgers. That stems from loving baseball, which stems from loving sports, which stems from loving competition and challenges. I’ve played, watched, talked and written sports since I was just a toddling waddler, but along the way I never forgot the core values that sports demand. Specifically, sportsmanship. 

Sure, I’ve had my moments. In high school, I faked a tag at second base and the kid slid in hard, hurting his ankle. A few times I half-heartedly shook the soccer referees’ hands after a match and glared instead of saying “good game” (this may seem paltry, but I assure you that’s unsportsmanlike in soccer). And as all kids do, I refused to lose in anything, forcing as many rematch as possible against any opponent who beat me in any athletic competition.

But I’ve grown up, and every day that I watch baseball I realize another way that the game is beautiful and brilliant and perfect.

Baseball demands respect. It demands its disciples to play a fair, passionate, exceptional version of sport. Mental wars rage between and during every…single…pitch.

Not only do pitchers, hitters, coaches and fans have to be smart and loyal to love this game, but they must be quick, yet patient; relaxed, yet stubborn. And then after all the dust settles, even in the face of their most bitter rival, or even a day after an all-out brawl, they must be professional, courteous sportsmen to the highest degree.

Don’t get me wrong here – baseball is no golf or tennis. And you may even be confused by the vision of the winning team high-fiving and jumping around after each victory, as the defeated sulk back to their clubhouse, not a congratulations to be uttered.

But these players have the utmost respect for one another, and show it after the after parties end. Many of them are friends from meeting during Spring Training, or through agents, or media experiences. They take to Twitter to thank fans for their support, give props to fellow players on big games.

And the most simple-minded fan should understand. We should all realize that even more than our respective favorite teams, our favorite players and everything in between…the game itself is above it all.

It’s an art form, and it deserves to be treated like one. Therefore, when a piece of art is twirled as fine as something like a perfect game, you give the artist the congratulations and respect he deserved. Regardless of the jersey he wears.

The hatred I feel towards the San Francisco Giants is like nothing I’ve ever known before. It comes with the territory of being a die-hard, true blue Dodgers fan since the day I was born. I live in Giants country, and immerse myself in the greatest rivalry outside Yankees/Red Sox on a daily basis. I’m behind enemy lines, and I know more about the rival fan base than I ever cared to before.

And yet, I watched the end of Matt Cain’s perfect game. I enjoyed it. I frowned when the Dodgers lost that night, and the Giants gained a game in the standings. I was upset that my team lost a game they should have won. But that night was Matt Cain’s and Matt Cain’s only.

He threw a perfect game. It was incredible. He’s one of only 22 successfully perfect pitchers out of the thousands and thousands who have tried. And we all should revel in the moment as fans of this game. 

Dodgers fans get a bad rap from other baseball fans – some deserved, some based in fiction:

FACT – “We,” on average, show up late and leave early. That’s the nature of the beast when you’re living in Los Angeles, traffic capital of the universe.

FICTION – “We” have thug fans, more focused on picking fights than enjoying the game. L.A. is a rough area, and as with every fan base, we have some tough fans. But it’s hard to find a fan base whose population dedicates its heart to a sports team more than the Dodgers.

But let’s not give the rest of the fans out there another reason to hate on us. Let’s not be classless.

When the Giants score, let’s curse the day the opposing pitcher was born. When they win a game, let’s throw something at the TV screen. But when their ace pitcher throws one of the most ridiculously impressive, artistic games in the 150-year history of this sport?

Let’s stand up and give him a quick round of applause. Giants fans would do the same for us. Sometimes the ones you hate win and the ones you love lose. That’s the way sports work. If you can’t handle it, you’re in for a lifetime of misery and internal anguish.

And as for Twitterius Angrius Maximus from the beginning of this blog? Your hero Matt Kemp would surely congratulate Cain on such a fine performance.

Get a grip. Be a good fan of the Dodgers and the sport itself.

On a Happy Father’s Day, I’m going to keep preaching exactly what MY old man always taught me. Whether it be baseball, soccer, horseshoes or Scrabble. Play fair, play to win, and above all, be a good sport.

Football, Jamilton and Announcements

May 25, 2012

I swear, I’m not just talking football today out of a semi-depression that my Dodgers lost to the ASTROS yesterday. Again. With Clayton Kershaw on the mound. Sigh.

I’ll forget the fact that we have been outscored 15-1 by Houston in our last two meetings combined. And just talk about something exceptionally exciting: the San Francisco 49ers, my hometown football team. My Dodgers of the NFL.

And that they are coming off a 13-3 season that was two muffed punts away from turning into a march to the Super Bowl. And that they are better this year. And the whole top-ranked defense is back. And our rookies are going to be game-changers. And we have brand new wide receivers. And we have no Chilo Rachal. And we have a healthy (finally) Michael Crabtree, who oh by the way, put up ELITE numbers in the second half of 2011. And we have a full off-season under Jim Harbaugh (also known as God, in my circles) for the players to learn his playbook and gel even more as a team.

All I have to say about that, is watch out everyone. If there is still any doubt in a fan’s mind that the 49ers are to be taken seriously as one of two or three legitimate Super Bowl contenders at this point in the summer, said fan is insane. Or a Raiders fan. Okay, so definitely insane.

Can you tell I’m excited?

As for dominant teams and players, I’ll stray away from the Dodgers for once. Remember, they lost to the Astros last night? Yeesh.

How about the Texas Rangers? Again. They dropped 14 runs today and Nelson Cruz had 8 RBI. That’s all the attention Nelly will get from me though. I’m here to talk about their best player, and possibly the best player in baseball: Josh Hamilton.

I’m not going to heap praise on the guy, I just want to ask one simple question: Can Jamilton hit 62? After hitting one today, he’s got 19 on the season in less than 50 games. I’m no math whiz, but considering there are 162 games in a season, I’d have to say he’s on pace for approximately 60.

Who’s to say he can’t go on another ridiculous streak and bomb 8 in one week? He’s certainly got the eye, the strength and the swing to do more damage. My only problem is he hasn’t played a full season…ever? Chances are, Hamilton will miss a chunk of about 15-20 games, which could greatly hinder his home run chase.

My verdict: Hamilton goes nuts this year. But not nuts enough. I’ll give him an average well over .300, 52 homers and 145 RBI. Those numbers will earn him the MVP and two of the three Triple Crown categories. But the home run record will remain Roger Maris’.

Suck on that, Barry, Mark and Sammy.

Last on the agenda today, a sad announcement. Jam Shots will be moving to a weekly format, instead of daily. I’ve been writing this (almost) daily since January 23rd, a span of 130 days by the end of this month. This is my 113th post, out of 125 days.

I’m impressed with myself. That’s like…like…a .900 batting average! Unheard of! Incredible! Hall of Fame worthy!

Alas, I can’t keep up. I’m hanging up my keyboard and going into more of a player/manager role. I do anticipate a couple of things: my weekly blogs will be even MORE epic. And, I get to also post weekly on my old blog, Jamblin’ Man! That one won’t be about sports, so 90 percent of my audience will actually read them. If you like my sports, stick with Jam Shots. Otherwise, be ready for the revival of an old friend.

And there will just be so much more room for activities.

Jam Shots will be strictly for sports, posted once a week. Jamblin’ Man will show off my freelance writing SKILLZ, with just thoughts, ramblings, poetry, travel writing, creative writing and everything in between. And of course…that will be posted once a week as well.

Thanks to everyone who has clicked my silly links every day in 2012, and hopefully, when June rolls around and this baby goes weekly, you’ll stick with me and continue to read.

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter @Jamblinman!

Defending Dodger Fans’ Honor

May 8, 2012

You know…there are some days when I log on to this blog and go, “What the HELL am I going to write about today?” When that happens, sometimes I post a bunch of crap. Other times, like today, something magically appears that I feel strongly about and feel inclined to write about.

When I was perusing the blogosphere this morning (yes, I do that), I came across THIS madness

Henry Schulman, I’m not one to call names. But you are a raging douche canoe. And you should be fired as a Giants beat writer, because you clearly don’t understand their most important rivalry.

Schulman was literally the only person in Los Angeles last night who thought Dodger fans were booing Matt Kemp. We are talking about a legitimate MVP candidate every season, who is hitting over .400 by the way.

Dodger fans may show up late, they may leave early. But they don’t boo their own players undeservedly. I want to punch Schulman’s puppy. Right in the face. Twice.

Also, I’m not one to engage in petty bloguments (yes I am), but if you want to attack Dodger fans, two can play at this game.

Let me just point out that Dodgers fans boo whenever the Giants score a run. And I don’t mean just against us. I mean when we see on TV that they score a run, we boo. In our living rooms. That’s what a rivalry IS. We wish ill will on the Giants in the form of going 0-162 every…single…season.

And we expect the same to happen the other way around. That being said, I’ve BEEN to AT&T for games multiple times. I live there, I can’t stay away from baseball. And I’ve sat in the bleachers, and never been more disappointed by a general group of sober fans’ lack of knowledge about their team.

I’m not saying those fans aren’t legit, and I definitely don’t think that faction represents the general knowledge level of Giants fans (trust me…tons of my friends are SF fans and they know their shit). But if this Schulman guy thinks he knows the rivalry, he needs to take a step back and make sure he’s not part of that bleacher crew himself.

Because even true Giants fans know that Dodgers fans wouldn’t boo our franchise player. We’ve been tortured since 1988, and the only thing we’ve done wrong since then is not sat in three hours of traffic to see them play in person.

Forget Tim Lincecum…Henry Schulman is now public enemy number one.

Follow me on Twitter @Jamblinman!


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